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Throughout this election year, women have visited the gravesite of the revolutionary suffragette Susan B. Anthony and place their "I Voted" stickers on her grave. And Tuesday, as voters prepare to hopefully elect our first female president, the cemetery has set up special accommodations for the occasion.

Hours at the Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester have been extended, guides and security guards will be on site late into the night, and lights have been set up to help people make their way to the grave. A livestream of Anthony's headstone has also been set up so that people outside of the Rochester area can be part of the tradition to honor a woman who fought tirelessly to get women the right to vote, yet never got to legally vote in her lifetime.

Due to national publicity and the recognized significance of the country's first female presidential nominee, the cemetery is expecting more stickers than ever; before 10 a.m. the grave was already completely covered. To account for the heavy traffic, commemorative poster boards are also set up to move the stickers to throughout the day, and for people to write messages of thanks to Anthony.

This tradition is important, not only for residents of Rochester, but for all women to remind them not to take something like the right to vote for granted. Women like Anthony dedicated their lives to gain equal rights for women, and so many of them never saw the success of their hard work.

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Not only did it take over 50 years (OVER. FIFTY. YEARS.) after Anthony and the suffragettes began the suffrage movement to pass the 19th amendment, there were restrictions on the law and many African-American women did not get the right to vote until the '60s.

So cast your vote today in memory of the women who got us where we are, and to a future that is female.

Top photo via Instagram @FeministFightClub

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