Everyday, countless women are catcalled, harassed, and berated based solely on our gender. In a world where people shrug off sexism and claim that the feminist movement is no longer relevant, it helps to have a reminder like Everyday Sexism, a website devoted to chronicling submitted real-life experiences of girls and women. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. The photographer Elinor Carucci’s recent series Mother reads like a visual diary of the pains and pleasures of motherhood, a raw and uncensored confessional of love and a complex relationship to the female body. Within the aesthetic framework of more traditional portrayals of the mother, she highlights the visceral and bodily with romantic reverence. Read More
  When we think of beauty pageants, we think of doe eyes, blond ringlets, and tiny waists; the bizarre ritual of choosing the most beautiful woman in the room seems antiquated and oppressive. But it turns out that prior to Women’s Liberation, pageantry was an even more surreal and shocking part of the American experience, and the queens provide insight into their contemporary social and political climate, cataloging the strange ways in which women were expected to express Western ideals of feminine beauty and grace. Read More
Two days ago, the Army revised its grooming regulations to prohibit hairstyles specific to black women; although dreadlocks and twists have been disallowed since 2005, these new rules are shockingly strict, banning the growth of natural hair from exceeding 2 inches and braids from being wider than one quarter inch.    Black women make up a whopping one third of females in the military, explains the Georgia National Guard member Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs, who has served for 6 years; in protest of the prejudicial regulations, she wrote this petition. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. “Hermaphrodite [sex … is] the sex of the angels,” explains Claudette, an intersex sex worker, to the photographer Malika Gaudin-Delrieu. The pair began their collaboration after meeting in Claudette’s native Switzerland, where Gaudin-Delrieu was documenting the country’s legalized prostitution. With her recent series of photographs, the artist elegantly dispels stigma around complex gender identities; as seen through her lens, Claudette is a woman, a husband, and a father. Read More
The answer to the question “If women knew how to behave, there would be less rape: agree or disagree?” seems painfully obvious, but in a world dominated in part by victim-blaming and rampant rape culture, a tragic number or global citizens are inclined to select “agree.” A recent survey by the Institute of Applied Economic Research in Brazil revealed that 58.5% percent of those interviewed (both male and female) agreed with the aforementioned statement; a shocking 65. Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. A few weeks ago, we featured a powerful group of photographs of a breast cancer survivor bearing her beautiful body as a means of encouraging women (and men!) around the world; sadly, the woman was criticized for her near-nudity, causing her to lose over 100 Facebook friends. As a culture, we are surrounded by images of naked, overtly sexualized women, and yet honest portrayals of brave women battling this illness and others are considered to be profane or wrong. It’s about time that changed. Read More
Meet Duncan Lou: a beautiful and playful boxer whose gorgeous spirit will stay with you long after you finish reading this post. At 8 weeks old, the miraculous canine lost his two rear legs to amputations after it was discovered that surgery could not repair some damage he’d had since birth. As reported by the amazing Panda Paws Rescue shelter for special needs dogs, Duncan Lou insists on running without his wheelchair, bounding about faster than you can say “Jiminy Cricket. Read More
  For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Read More
  Trigger warning: mildly graphic imagery In a startling critique of the ways in which images of women’s bodies are consumed, the artist Jessica Ledwich presents “The Fanciful, Monstrous Feminine,” a collection of surreal photographs documenting the psychological consequences of contemporary beauty standards and practices. For Ledwich, female sexuality is viewed as “threatening” and is therefore oppressed; here, she exaggerates the femme fatale image, showing her red-lipped, square-nailed protagonist engaging in violence with her own body. Read More