By now, you’ve probably seen the plethora of Tumblr renditions of Marvel hero Wolverine as a Disney Princess. The idea is truly clever: David J Prokopetz invited artists to illustrate Wolver-Princess in celebration of Disney’s acquisition of Marvel. But have you considered just how brilliant this idea is?     In addition to being comical (get it?), the illustrations are a sharp examination of the feminine and masculine images we consume throughout our childhood. Read More
  Women come in all shapes and sizes. Plastic mannequins, on the other hand, rarely do.  The average woman in the UK is a size 16, but most British stores only display size 10 mannequins. The British women’s and equalities minister Jo Swinson has long been combating the narrow focus on thinner, whiter, younger models of feminine beauty in fashion; she writes, “[the image] is reinforced from the catwalks right through to shop mannequins. Read More
  If you’ve ever seen Toddlers & Tiaras, you’ve probably noticed that its allure lies in large part in our society’s obsession with what many consider to be unnatural or freakish. The beauty pageants shown take female beauty ideals to a upsetting extreme of sexualized infancy; toddlers parade on stage in Pretty Woman’s prostitute outfit and the like, wearing heavy make-up and fake adult teeth. So much of the series’s premise is about being disgusted with the poor children, who obviously are not at fault. Read More
Okay, so I know a lot of gamers--of all genders-- who are sick and tired of seeing women sexualized in video games. Disturbingly, recent research has suggested that women are damaged by playing as over-sexualized avatars in games. So why does the industry continue to churn out female characters in barely-there outfits? Warface, an online shooter features female soldiers in skimpy, highly ineffective fighting attire. Read More
Harmony Hammond. Suture, 2002.   The Lesbian Herstory Archives, an awesome ongoing collection of political and culturally relevant records of lesbian lives and herstory is hosting an art benefit, and it’s going to be really incredible.  Harmony Hammond, the artist and writer behind Heresies: A Feminist Publication of Art and Politics and Lesbian Art in America will present her current exhibition. As if that wasn’t enough, artists from 1978’s transcendent A Lesbian Show will be there, including Fran Winant, Dona Nelson, and  Flavia Rando. Read More
  I am so sick of the lame old stereotype “women are more emotional than men.” Aside from being blatantly false, it does damage. Often, women are disrespected in the workplace if we get heated over something important, or we’re told to “stop PMS-ing” if we have a personal drama. I will always remember the Sex and the City episode in which Samantha Jones is berated for being a working woman and cries only when she gets in the elevator. Read More
At 25, April Ashley was a sensation, gracing the pages of Vogue, appearing in Blockbuster hits, and partying with celebrities and socialites. Those who witnessed her rise to fame called it “fairytale-like.” She rubbed elbows and flirted with Elvis Presley. April Ashley is also a transsexual, and she is one of the first people ever to transition from male to female through reassignment surgery.  Sadly, the glamour of her life and career was short-lived, as a friend exposed her gender assignment to Sunday People. Read More
  With song titles like “Miss Independent,” pop star Kelly Clarkson   would seem to most like a feminist. But she doesn’t see it that way. In conversation with TIME’s Belinda Luscombe, Clarkson stated the word feminist is “too strong. I think when people hear feminist, it’s like, ‘Get out of my way, I don’t need anyone.’” She goes on to explain, “I love that I’m being taken care of, and I have a man that’s a leader. Read More
  Happy Hallow's Eve's Eve, BUSTies! As another year comes to a close we don our carefully crafted outfits and munch on yummy candy, new controversies erupt over what costumes are socially acceptable or too revealing. And a lot of times, these conversations revolve around what women are entitled to wear. So before you head out tomorrow, take a listen to this awesome slam poetry from Washington D.C’s Brave New Voices Grand Slam Finals 2013. Because despite how we feel about barely-there costumes and the like, we women are all in this together. Read More
  I once met a female construction worker. When discussing her job, she actually teared up. Not only is she paid less than her male peers because she physically cannot lift as much as many of them can, but she also faces sexual harassment on a daily basis; she is called “weak” and “a little girl,” and she hid the fact that she was gay for fear of bullying. Read More