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What Wednesday's Super Blue Blood Moon Means For Witches

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If you’re an early riser and live in the United States, you might see something pretty cool tomorrow morning: a rare lunar eclipse known as the “Super Blood Blue Moon.” At around 5:51 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, the Earth will move in between the sun and the moon, creating a fiery, copper color in the sky —this is what we know as a blood moon. Because the moon will be closer to Earth than usual, it’ll be a supermoon, and because this is the second full moon in one month, it will be a blue moon. This trifecta hasn’t happened since 1866, according to Space.com.

For those into astrology, magic, and all kinds of witchery, the Super Blood Blue Moon will be a prime time for self-reflection and meditation. There are a series of healing and wish-granting spells you can check out during this time of intense spiritual energy. You can also take advantage of the moon to create moon water if you have a glass jar and some salt.

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With some slight variations, witches everywhere will prepare for the moon the night before by placing jars of water outside or on a windowsill near direct moonlight. They will light candles or incense, and maybe leave some crystals or sage near the jar to bless the water. There are different simple spells that can then be used, including, “I bless this water with sage / so mote it be” or “queen of moon, goddess of stars / bless the water within this jar.” Before performing the spell, it's considered commonplace for a witch to create a protective ring of salt around herself.

The moon water can then be used for many purposes, including cleaning, cooking, and bathing.

the craft cd24ePhoto via Columbia Pictures / The Craft (1996)

Happy supermoon!

Top photo via Wikimedia Commons / Abhranil Kundu

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Lydia Wang is a writer, pug enthusiast, and hopeless romantic. She lives in New York, writes for BUST, and overshares on Twitter: @lydiaetc.

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