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The Human Rights Campaign is a civil rights organization whose entire purpose is to achieve equality for LGBTQ individuals. Reportedly, its office is home to the same exclusionary employment practices against which they fight. As one employee put it, “We are supposed to be fighting for people who are being discriminated against and marginalized, however we at HRC are discriminating against people and marginalizing people in the workplace.” The Pipeline Project did an extensive review of HRC’s workplace culture last fall. The report was recently...
Like many fledgling gamers growing up in the early 2000s, I spent a sizable chunk of my childhood trying to rescue Princess Peach. Jamming the buttons of my silver Gameboy SP with primal ferocity, I crossed harsh, distant lands and ground-pounded pixelated Goombas for her, collecting bonus coins, mushrooms, and 1-ups along the way.  She was the perpetual damsel in distress – the delicate, classically beautiful prize waiting in a flouncy pink ball gown at the end of every Super Mario Bros. adventure. But she was...
“OK,” says BUST photographer Ramona Rosales to actor/comedian Kumail Nanjiani halfway through their shoot at a bar near his home in L.A. “Now it’s time to bring the sexy.” Raising his extremely expressive eyebrows, the 37-year-old replies, “I thought I was bringing the sexy. That was my 11.” Sexy might not be an adjective typically associated with Nanjiani, mainly because he is best known for playing the incredibly smart but socially hapless developer Dinesh on HBO’s Silicon Valley, which is wrapping up its second season. But there is something quite appealing about the...
It’ll be easier than ever to pretend that Chloe Sevigny is your real life BFF with her new 'zine, “No Time For Love.” A collection of photos of the men in her life, “No Time For Love” features Polaroids and photo booth snapshots (and lots of stickers, to protect the boys’ anonymity, and because stickers are great). “We wanted it to be more like me in my real life, who I really am… we wanted it to be something more real,” Sevigny said of the...
Photographer Jo Farrell spent nine years working on her latest project: Documenting the last Chinese women with bound feet. The results are remarkable. Farrell says she wants the message of her project to be one of survival: “In Chinese society, it was the only way forward for women. They did it because they thought it would give them a better future, a better life.” (Often, working class girls would have their feet bound in the hopes of marrying into wealthier families.) If nothing else, these...
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