Quantcast

Blog

Comedian Sarah Silverman shows her dramatic side in I Smile Back, a dark suburban drama about addiction and mental illness. Silverman’s character, Laney, is living a seemingly perfect life as a housewife and mother of two. But beneath the surface, she’s addicted to drugs, booze, and sex: an early scene shows her sleeping with her husband’s friend, doing coke, and then going to pick her kids up from school. After a binge leads to a collapse, she reluctantly goes to rehab. There, she finally begins...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
  For Christmas 2013, my parents gave me and my two sisters each a copy of Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar. My relationship with Cheryl Strayed went from “Yeah, I’ve heard of Wild but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet” to “Leave me alone, I’m reading Cheryl Strayed and I can’t stop so please get out of here.” I have spent countless hours and days completely submerged in her world and in her writing, for the very precious reason that...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
Steve Jobs, directed by Danny Boyle, is not the celebratory bio pic I expected—it’s way better. Jobs is a superbly acted and visually stunning film that questions the cult of genius! We follow Steve Jobs (Michael Fassbender) through three product launches over a span of 14 years. In the pressure-filled moments before he takes the stage, the cracks in his life split open, forcing him off his one-track mind. Jobs breezes through one confrontation after the other, which might be grating for the audience if it weren’t...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
Imagine a panel of female showrunners - the women who make the big decisions on hit series like Madame Secretary, VEEP, The Good Wife and Louie. Now, imagine that the panel hasn’t been billed as a pinkified, sparkly ~women in television~ event. That’s exactly what happened last week at the New York Television Film Fest. On Tuesday, October 20, NYTVF held its Creative Keynote Panel, titled “Running The Show; A Big Picture Conversation On Creating For The Small Screen.” Notice something about that title? There’s absolutely...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
Normally, praising Barbie is not a thing I do. With a severely disproportioned body design, too much makeup and an impractical number of high heels, Mattel's leading lady is usually shamed for teaching unrealistic body ideals to young girls. But Barbie's new YouTube commercial is asking us to "Imagine The Possibilities" that can come from girls playing with the (in)famous dolls.  Following five young girls as they take on the roles of a veterinarian, a college professor, a men's soccer coach, a tour guide, and a traveling business...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.