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Sometime around the release of his 1984 album Climate of Hunter, Scott Walker discorporated and his consciousness scattered. Periodically, he’s able to gather his atoms back together and create a harrowing dispatch from the ether before vanishing for another decade or so. His once-golden voice reduced to a haunted wail, Walker painstakingly recreates the sounds of traveling through half-existence surrounded by phantoms of the 20th century’s cruelty. Maybe that’s all a little dramatic, but it’s nearly impossible to use the conventional language...
Actress Rebel Wilson was just announced last night to be the host of next year’s MTV movie awards.  Which will probably be the first time I’ll be watching them since I realized when I was 14 that MTV wasn’t actually cool. The thing I like about Rebel is that she’s exactly what her name indicates.  She embraces her body-type, and has enough confidence to put herself out there.  While I wouldn’t say she makes fun of herself, she doesn’t pretend to be someone she’s not.  But...
Ellie Goulding ’s debut Lights reached the U.S. in 2011, but it didn’t take off for over a year. Now, Goulding is new pop royalty, and Halcyon presents a stark contrast to her introduction. Where Lights possessed an almost naïve view of the world, Halcyon shows her to have matured. Songs like “My Blood” and “Dead in the Water” take hopelessness to new heights. There are some nods to EDM—as on the Calvin Harris –produced bonus track “I Need Your Love”—but most of the al-...
I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for The Amazing Kreskin, the world’s greatest mentalist. I remember first being mystified by his mind-reading tricks during one of his 61 appearances on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson in the ’70s. And when I discovered earlier this year that Hulu had made multiple episodes of his ’70s Canadian TV show The Amazing World of Kreskin available online, I devoured all the conversations on the occult he had with luminaries of the era like Phyllis...
It’s the perfect time for Jack Kerouac’s iconic autobio- graphical novel On the Road to come to the big screen, despite skepticism that this singular staple of beat liter- ature has finally been sold out. Today we find ourselves in an era of uncertain futures populated by emasculated, cigarette-smoking young men with thick-framed glasses and the women who love them—not unlike the late ’40s. Screenwriter Jose Rivera’s script is still true to the original as he transforms the meandering first-person narrative of aspiring writer Sal...