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For the past 11 years, the Toy Industry Association has crowned a "Toy of the Year," enlisting consumers, retailers, and journalists to help decide which toy/game deserves the title. There are 11 categories (including "Active Toy," "Boy Toy," "Educational Toy"), each with a winner--but only one toy/game can win the mother of all the awards. The awards seemed innocuous enough until I checked out the categories. First of all, toys are divided into “boy” and “girl” designations, which is unnecessary. But the nature of the toys is more disappointing.

At 26 years-old, I’m not ashamed to say that teenager Tavi Gevinson might be my hero. She's been running her own blog, Style Rookie, since she was 11, and in September she started Rookie, an online magazine that tries to make up for the loss of Sassy oh so many years ago—way back in 1996 to be exact, the same year Ms. Gevinson was born. She’s had her own New Yorker profile and probably has Miranda July on speed dial, so to hear that The Economist looked to Tavi for predictions on what the youngsters will be up to in 2012 wasn’t too surprising.

   I can’t believe we haven't written anything on Nightwish yet! Though the frontwoman has changed over the years, this Finnish symphonic metal band has always had a lady singing lead. (Tarja Turunen was the lead singer until 2005, when she was replaced by Swedish singer Anette Olzon.) The sound has changed a bit over the years; Anette’s voice is not as operatic as Tarja’s octave-defying vocals, and the music has grown more and more orchestral with each album.

I am so far from a wine purist that it’s not even funny. I mean, I'd prefer it doesn't come from a box, but 90% of the time, my choice is based on the attractiveness of the label. (Yes, I’m one of those people.) So this article from one of last week’s issues of the New York Times caught my eye almost as much as the labels it discusses. There’s apparently a trend in the wine-naming world toward sassy, obnoxious titles. From an advertising standpoint, the appeal is clear: the name stands out, and that’s the first step toward getting a customer to buy.

It's the most wonderful time of the year--you know, when every magazine, blog, and 13-year-old with a Tumblr compiles a "best of 2011" list and makes you feel old and out of touch for not having heard of half of the people on it. So hold on to your butts, because BUST is jumping into the fray with our very own Best of 2011 Spotify playlist. Yeah, Drake is on it. I'm just as ashamed as you are. Click here to listen and subscribe!Notable omissions: "212" by Azealia Banks, which runs circles around Nicki Minaj's "Super Bass." Unfortunately, Ms.

I browse so many articles online each day, but this one's my favorite today, by far. After seeing a lesbian couple outside a bar in Washington State, William Adam Lane started yelling nasty comments, and even smashed the back window of their car. Were the women intimidated? Did they cry, or go into hysterics, or faint? Nope. Instead, one of the women tackled the man and pinned him to the ground to keep him from getting away, while they waited for the authorities to arrive. The guy was arrested for harassment and could be charged with assault.

Thanks to all the awesome vendors and attendees who came to the BUST Magazine Craftacular and Food Fair Holiday 2011 in NYC last weekend! For two days, more than 200 vendors from across the country sold their handmade wares and edible goodies. Crafters of all ages also had the chance to make gifts like mini snow globes and tiny terrariums at The BUST DIY Guide to Life Lab.Check out the photo gallery below to see all the fun!Photographs taken by Gabi Porter.

I am a burlesque performer. I have been taking my clothes off for a crowd pretty regularly for about three years.  I was drawn to burlesque because it offered complete creative freedom, and I was also pretty stoked on the body-positivism it inspired – in me, in my fellow performers, and in the audience.

An article in the Boston Globe this week, “Led By the Child Who Simply Knew,” tells the story of the Maines family and their 14-year-old twins, Nicole and Jonas. Nicole was born a male named Wyatt, but has been identifying as female ever since she was old enough to grasp the concept of gender: When Wyatt was 4, he asked his mother: “When do I get to be a girl?’’ He told his father that he hated his penis and asked when he could be rid of it. Both father and son cried. When first grade started, Wyatt carried a pink backpack and a Kim Possible lunchbox.

Searching the words “ballet” and “feminism” in tandem is unlikely to yield many inspiring results. After all, ballet has a unique rep in people’s perceptions of the dance world—as a rigorous discipline that celebrates only traditional femininity and promotes unhealthy body-image standards.
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