Blog

In 1977, two young friends from art school, Ana da Silva (left) and Gina Birch (below), toyed with the idea of starting a band over pints in north London. After watching their friend Palmolive perform with the Slits, they were inspired to experiment as musicians themselves. Neither had much experience playing an instrument, but that was part of punk’s appeal: expression trumped expertise. A year later, they graced the stage at the International Performance Art festival in Warsaw, Poland, as the founders of an all-female punk quartet called the Raincoats.

  Produced by husband-and-wife team Kate Clere McIntyre and Michael McIntyre, the new documentary Yogawoman is far more than the flexible poses it depicts. The most joyful documentary I’ve ever seen, Yogawoman harnesses the knowledge and activism of yoga rock stars and takes you on a trip to nine different countries, while providing insight into a variety of yoginis leading a quiet revolution. The filmmakers interviewed over 70 amazing women who have found their voice and power through yoga.

Back in the Spring 2002 “Fight Like a Girl” Issue of BUST, I wrote a feature celebrating flicks about girls getting even. Some of my favorite movies of all time made the list, including Carrie, Nine to Five, and Heathers. And I was reminded again recently what great fodder the young woman + payback formula really is when I received a press screener of the aptly named new ABC drama Revenge*.

An upstate New York teen is getting her fifteen minutes of fame in a positive, woman- empowering way. Lexi Peters made  history when she became the first lady of video games in National Hockey League. Frustrated with the lack of female options when playing her video games, she decided to do something about it. Her father encouraged her to write a letter to the company to explain her conondrum. She proceeded to write to the CEO of EA Sports, the creators of the video games NHL 10 and 11.

David Quinn might not be a name on your fashion radar, but this underground icon is poised to bring his fun, flattering fabric creations to the mainstream. Quinn makes art for artists to wear, creating costumes for dancers and circus performers, and gowns for brides and burlesque stars alike. He is known for unconventional fashion shows that double as performance art, and for working with neo-burlesque beauties such as World Famous *BOB* and recent Lagerfeld muse Dirty Martini, women whose charisma and curves require equally impressive clothes.

The St. Mark’s Bookshop opened in 1977 on New York’s Lower East Side and has become a well-loved cultural establishment, attracting and embracing a devoted following inside its literature-lined walls. Bibliophiles cite the shop’s vast collection of unique tomes as well as its cozy-but-cultured atmosphere as reasons to frequent the shop--indeed, it has become a haven for students and famous authors alike.

I didn't always connect with photography, but I've recently come to appreciate all the raw emotion, nostalgia, and feelings you can get from it (thank you black-and-white photography class!). So now, when I look at photographs, I find myself not just staring at a picture with effects I probably can't name, but being enamored and drawn into a whole new  world; the eyes of someone else. Such is art, bringing out all sorts of things you didn't expect it to. Such is, photojournalism?Let's look at Moa Karlberg, for example.

When I heard designer and fellow San Antonian, Angelina Mata, was showcasing her Spring/Summer 2012 ready-to-wear collection for this year's Fashion Week, I knew I had to be there. I'd never seen her work before and wasn't sure what to expect, but I knew I wanted to celebrate Texan style makers and lovers in NYC.  I have to say, I was really blown away by her Atelier collection. Not only were the clothes gorgeous, but each was a look from head to toe of impeccable styling and rather than a traditional runway show, the models stood as a sort of living installation of pure fashion.

I have a big popcorn bowl ready for a History Detectives segment on Tuesday, September 20th (PBS, 8-9 ET). This episode, which focuses on women's suffrage, is worth watching because it’s rare that women’s history gets much play on national TV.  The History Detectives program on September 20th features Yvonne Blemly Crumlish and probes the mystery of her grandmother Addie's suffrage pennant that Yvonne's father gave her 30 years ago.

Inspired by "nostalgia for a simpler time," Suzanne Rae created a simple, stylishly zen-like collection for Fashion Week using crepe de chine, silk chiffon, hemp jersey, and raw silk. The collection was quiet, but comprised of some very polished, clean looks. You could actually see the pieces on everyday kind of girls (except maybe that awesome straw coat thing above). There was an effortlessly hip kind of vibe to a lot of the looks and the models even look less like models and more like that super cool girl everyone knows.