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Managing Editor of BUST, Emily Rems, was asked to speak on yesterday’s edition of Soundcheck radio show, on NPR affiliate WNYC, about Led Zeppelin’s epically infamous “Stairway to Heaven.” She was joined by die-hard metal fan and blogger Phil Freeman in debating the worth and significance of this classic and “timeless” hit.

Rumor has it that on the first Thanksgiving, Myles Standish took to the Plymouth Plantation stage and dropped sweet rhymes and fat beats. Rumor also has it that he and his friends stole a lot of land and killed a lot of Native Americans, but we'll talk about that later. Anyway, the musical tradition continues! You can catch rapper Nicki Minaj at NYC's Hammerstein Ballroom this Thanksgiving, November 25th. Tickets are on sale now. Skip the pumpkin pie (no, bring it with you!) and check out the show, which starts at 7:30 pm.

Attention Big Apple lovers and bookworms alike: the Zinester's Guide to NYC official release party and reading is this Thursday, November 11th, at the Housing Works Bookstore Cafe in New York City! There will be plenty to enjoy, such as the Bushwick Book Club performing original songs inspired by the ZG2NYC, a zine fair for contributors' zines and self-published comics, a recitation of favorite listings, and a competition for fabulous low budget prizes in ZG2NYC's live $2 Pyramid Game Show.

Throughout the tenure of his career, Cee Lo Green has managed to sit at a number of lunch tables without having to rep a specific set. From his early days in Southern Hip-Hop outfit Goodie Mob, to becoming the vocal front man for the Grammy Award winning Gnarls Barkley, Mr. Green has managed to transcend space and time with genre-bending tunes. The Lady Killer (Atlantic) grabs the greatest moments of the 50s through the 80s, with some Hip-Hop essentials sprinkled in.

When it comes to Pee-Wee Herman, either you get it, or you don’t. As a die-hard fan who was 11 when his Saturday morning children’s show hit the airwaves, I was nothing short of obsessed when I heard he was re-mounting his original 1981 stage production on Broadway this fall. And when I finally got to see it for myself, the experience literally took my breath away.

With our Science Issue currently on newsstands, we are excited about a new play, Photograph 51, that tells the story of Rosalind Franklin, the incredible scientist who played a crucial- and widely unacknowledged- part in he discovery of DNA's double helix. Presented by the Ensemble Studio Theatre and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, in a motion to enhance our understanding of science and technology, the play is written by Anna Ziegler and directed by Linsay Firman.

Responding to street harassment can be tough. "Common wisdom" often dictates to simply ignore, and many people do - after all, you may feel threatened, exhausted, or simply unable to formulate an appropriate comeback. Personally, I do my best to counter with something - whether it's a Jerri Blank-esque face, an obscene hand gesture, or a disgusted eye roll- but sometimes I long for a more reliable and solid go-to response.

There’s a stubborn pall that blankets Atlantic City. Once a hotbed of Mobster decadence during Prohibition (hi, HBO’s Boardwalk Empire!), the New Jersey gambling town puttered out into a miasma of bedbugs and barflies during the ’60s. It’s never quite shaken that reputation of being Vegas’ developmentally disabled cousin, no matter how many entrepreneurs have descended upon its carcass.

I recently read an article written by Andrew McMillen called How To Be A Live Music Critic. The piece basically pokes fun of music journalists and lists in bullet points examples of what NOT to focus on in a live show review. One of the points that stood out to me most is: "You must not use more than half of your word limit to describe the band’s music. This is a waste of valuable words, which could be better devoted to describing stage attire, between-song banter, drink prices and/or bar staff temperament.

The last time I wrote about Promethea here I'd just gotten my hands on the first Absolute volume, and it had blown my mind. "It's less a narrative than a trip, fables layered on top of stories and characters' identities shifting into dreams. If Watchmen is Moore's Ulysses, then Promethea is Finnegans Wake and it demands the same experience--stop trying to make it make sense and just let it wash over you and enjoy the ride." The second volume arrived last week, and I'm just as thrilled with it.
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