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Madge is back with another video, and aside from the obvious "damn she looks GOOD!" comment I could make, I'll point out that the video for "Girl Gone Wild" is definitely a step up from the fun-but-kinda-weird "Give Me All Your Luvin'." For me, the oddness of the latter video could be attributed to the grating misspelling of "loving," but also because focuses on a topic that's not dear to my heart--football. (I understand it was a tie-in with her Super Bowl performance, but still.) But this latest video is pure Madonna. Meaning it’s sexy, badass, and very cool.

You know the drill. You’re going on a date or to a party with someone new, so you overzealously tell your friends as much information as you can (name and phone number of your date, where you’re going) in case you end up in a sticky situation, and promise to text them when you get home safely. Since college, my friends and I have been using this system to keep us as safe as possible, but of course, this plan is far from foolproof.

Imagine you’re on the elliptical at the gym or biking to work thinking about Snooki’s pregnancy, Obama, and global warming when you feel a twitch right under your biking shorts. The good twitch. You start to breath a little deeper and the tingles start building, like the rapid ticks of a time bomb. You know what’s going on with your body, but why here? Why NOW? No, this isn’t my attempt at a BUST One-Handed Read; a new Kinsey Institute study is reporting that around 15% of women can orgasm while exercising.

Seeing Zola Jesus at the beginning of a festival like SXSW is a perilous activity, because the singer's so good at her job that you might end up holding the rest of the performers to an impossibly high standard. The first time I saw Zola Jesus was last year, on the first night of CMJ, and I spent the subsequent four days complaining that every other band was terrible. Last week at the Fader Fort, she was the final performer of the day, so I had time to get over my awe before judging any other acts too harshly.

And the March Madness continues! That horrible pun is not a reference to basketball, but to a different kind of TV event--AMC’s Mad Men, whose new season premieres March 25th. Since the promo videos are comprised of old footage, fans have little to speculate about regarding the new season, beyond the cast photos released earlier this month. Befitting of a show about the creative process of advertising, though, the fanbase has mobilized, creating its own material to hype the premiere.

There are countless poster girls for reading and literature, but so few of them know how to spit dope rhymes. La Shea Delaney and Annabelle Quezada (aka the B*tches in Bookshops) set out to change all that. Parodying Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “N*ggas in Paris,” these literary ladies spin verses about reading on the subway, buying print books instead of digital (best lyric: “You use a Kindle? I carry spines/Supporting bookshops like a bra, Calvin Klein”), and the eternal quest for a man who can keep up (with his reading, that is).

Every year, the Fader Fort at SXSW is a watershed event for festival goers, particularly those with small wallets and no badges. Last week’s edition was as insane as ever, with enough free beer to keep you tipsy for four days’ worth of indie hip-hop acts and experimental punk bands. I came, admittedly, for the free beer, and also to see Zola Jesus, about whom I will never stop rhapsodizing. But the Fader Fort is like Hotel California as sponsored by Converse, so if you want to see ZJ at 7:30, you can never, ever leave.  Enter Gary Clark Jr.

We’re so thankful to Marie Claire for reporting on how women tend to pay more than men for most things. The practice is called gender pricing, and it's everywhere. Gender pricing takes place in the sale of health insurance, dry cleaning, haircuts, home mortgages, cars, and many, many more products and services. Toiletries such as shampoos, soaps, razors, and deodorants are marketed differently to men and women, although they are NEARLY IDENTICAL, with the main difference being aesthetics and scent. And you can probably guess who pays more.

Like many Indian-Americans, I grew up watching Bollywood movies. I would sometimes try to get my non-Desi friends to watch the glitzy, musical-number laden films, to mixed responses. But I was overjoyed when the films that were so near and dear to my heart caught the American public’s attention – with the Academy Award nomination for the epic Lagaan (English: Land Tax) in 2001, and the “Jai Ho” fervor in the wake of Slumdog Millionaire.

A recent study conducted by Medco, a company that manages prescription benefits, found that in 2010, women took medication to treat depression or anxiety at a higher rate than men. In a study of two million patients, pharmacy records showed that 26 percent of women took drugs to treat mental-health issues in 2010, compared to 22 percent in 2001. Only 15 percent of men took the same medications in 2010 (up from 12 percent in 2001). Though the precise reason behind these findings isn't clear, Dr.
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