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(Yep, that is a picture of HBC spooning a tuna.) Helena Bonham Carter: a spectacular actress with a spectacular personality. We always knew she was quirky (in all the right ways), and now we have seven facts to prove it. 1. The fishy photo is part of a campaign to end overfishing by the Blue Marine Foundation. According to Carter, she is "actually very phobic about fish", but by the end of the shoot she reports that they had "truly bonded." 2. During Fight Club, she had her makeup artist...
We’re down to the negatives here in the Northeast, barely hoping to break freezing this week. It’s a level of cold that can’t be ignored, especially when it comes to outfit selection. So how do we go out into the world when we can barely get out of our beds? Lots and lots of layers. To make your winter days bearable, we rounded up eight of the warmest and cutest pairs of long underwear we know of. We fully recommend wearing these under plenty of...
Surprises come in all sizes—some as small as a box full of archived negatives, recounting a female sub-culture in London that was almost forgotten. Meet Ken Russell, who originally wanted to be a ballerina but turned to another kind of art when his father squashed his dream—photography. The freelance photographer-turned-film director soon became known for breaking the rules in his craft, producing some of post-war London's most expressive work. Russell’s photographs were largely thought to be lost, but when a box labeled “Ken Russell” was found...
It’s true! Little and Big Edie Beale will grace the big screen once again when this cult classic documentary opens in select theaters (starting at Film Forum in New York) this March, thanks to Janus Films. The East Hampton socialites-turned-recluses created a most unusual following when this doc, directed by Albert and David Maysles, first came out in 1976. The film takes place in the once lavish and stunning 28-room mansion lovingly named Grey Gardens after the color of its dunes, cement garden, and grey sea...
Black History month can sometimes feel bittersweet, since once February is over, celebrating blackness seems to end. But while it's here, artists are representing those women making a difference in black history. Then and now. The #WeAreBlackHistory series of photographs was created in order to celebrate women today who are using digital space to hone their voices and create a sense of unity in the black community. Using important online voices and pairing them up with legendary historical figures, the photographs link the women and their...
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