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The cast of Girls seems to be everywhere these days in print, but now you can take them everywhere with you in prints. Different prints, actually, thanks to Kevin Hilton at Vulture. The brilliance of this kind of Girls print-job is that it is in doll form. Each of the four cast members now has their own paper doll, complete with different outfits and accessories. If you've been watching the season, you'll be pleased to see that the intricacies of each character's life are perfectly addressed in their doll counterpart's adornments.

    The relationship between women and fashion is complicated, or at the very least, layered. We all need to buy clothes. That one’s obvious, or like the first layer. The second level of this cake (I’ve made it a cake) is the clothes that we buy reflect how we are judged. Teen girls all over the internet are counseling each on how to dress like a certain persona (i.e. Wear hemp bracelets if you want to be a surfer).

For better or worse, the closest thing to “natural” that many New Yorkers experience in their day to day lives may very well be shopping in the organic section of Whole Foods. Guerilla street art collective Mosstika is trying to change all that with their latest “graffiti” project. Rather than sprawling tags across the city in spray paint, Mosstika’s works are created using living grass and moss.   “We believe that if everyone had a garden of their own to cultivate, we would have a much more balanced relation to our territories,” they write.

It's finally hot enough to hit the beaches, and it's got me dreaming about the old-timey Coney Island-- when girls' bathing suits looked like complicated costumes and the rides were terribly unsafe, but terribly fun. Maybe I'm just idealizing things, but the old Coney Island is something extra special that now only exists in history. I love the idea of beaches flooded with straw boater hats, bathing costumes, swimming caps, rosy cheeks, sheer Edwardian dresses, and wool bathing suits (things I'm thankful do not exist anymore).

By Hilary Hughes Between the launch of her independent label Box of Cedar Records, last year's self-released full-length, fully funded by her fans album, and the recent release of The Sister, Marissa Nadler has had a big, big year. Nadler is embarking on a two-week tour that brings her through a handful of intimate venues from Massachusetts to DC before she arrives at NYC's Joe's Pub on June 16, then pops up again later this summer on the West Coast.

  Warmer weather and the first mosquitoes of the season have both descended on New York in recent weeks, the first harbingers of a fitfully approaching summer. Just before the city's many outdoor concert series kick into full swing, BUST had the chance to sample some indoor live music that seemed specially designed to ease the transition into the dog days. Up-and-coming pop duo MS MR, opening for Xylos at Glasslands Gallery last Friday, did just that, whether they set out to or not.

Some artists get better with age, and Patti Smith is definitely one of them. With the recent success of her book, Just Kids, about her relationship with late photographer Robert Maplethorpe, Smith’s receiving the most attention she’s had since the late 1970s. I’d bet that many of those who’ve read Just Kids aren’t even very familiar with Smith’s music. This makes the timing of her newest musical album, Banga, rather perfect. The four albums Smith’s made since her “comeback” in 1996 have pretty much flown under the radar.

By Lainna Fader Drew Denny is a master of laughing through tears. As she sat on my couch last month recounting her father’s last days before succumbing to pancreatic cancer and other painful memories from her childhood, she had the biggest smile on her face. That’s just how Denny operates—when given the choice to laugh or cry, she chooses to laugh.

By Nadia Chaudhury Girl meets boy, girl falls in love with boy, girl moves in with boy, boy proposes to girl, girl and boy plan wedding, boy dumps girl, girl attempts to find self. This isn’t your typical romantic comedy, where everything works out perfectly. This is Lola Versus. Helmed by director-writer Daryl Wein and his writing partner/significant other Zoe Lister-Jones, the New York-based Lola Versus positions itself as the raw and realistic antidote to the multitudes of shiny romantic-comedies that invade theaters.

Summer in the city is perfect for bicycle rides to work or to the park. The wind gets all breezy and you’re going so quickly you don’t have to worry about weird extended eye contact with anyone. I didn’t think bike rides could get much better, until I saw Ninian Doff’s short, “A Professional Display of No Handed Bike Moves.” Set to the infectious song “Golden Tree” by Martin Brooks, a few experienced lady and gent cyclists perform a variety of impressive, expressive, and hilarious hands-free gestures.
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