Quantcast
Blog | Page 756

Blog

  Anti-rape activist Amber Amour posted a picture of herself on Instagram minutes after she was raped by an acquaintance in a hotel room in Cape Town, South Africa in Nov. 2015. She sat in the shower, tears streaming down her face, knees against her chest as she detailed the rape to her followers, “As soon as I got in the bathroom, he forced me to my knees. I said 'stop!' but he just got more violent. He lifted me up and put his penis in...
Say hello to the new way you will entertain yourself at work! Tampon Run is an awesome, arcade-style game fighting period stigma and the normalization of violence. Plus, you get to throw tampons at mean boys!The game was made by two awesome young feminists, Andrea Gonzales and Sophie Houser. The Girls Who Code  graduates originally developed this game for the web but have since created an app.The game's introduction poses an important question: why is gun violence and gory, bloody death considered commonplace in media,...
  Once upon a time, Disney never stopped being problematic. Linguists Carmen Fought and Karen Eisenhauer have been working on a study that analyzes the dialogue in Disney movies in order to determine the verbal equality between male and female characters and to determine whether or not it plays a major role in the lives of children who view them. The study has already found that around 70% of all dialogue spoken in most Disney princess movies is by male characters. According to the research, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Tangled and...
Singer/songwriter Anya Marina has been quietly releasing some of indie rock’s best tracks for years. Her fourth full-length album, Paper Plane, is full of the same witty lyrics, accessible pop hooks, and images of a complicated woman’s life that have made her songs favorites of music supervisors in TV and film. This time, Marina focuses on romantic relationships; “Shut Up” is a slow burn about an unlikely hook-up, and the energetic “Ordinary Dude” is about a turning point in a relationship, with nicely contrasting vocals from...
In the 1920s and 30s, Joséphine Baker was an international superstar, known for her daring dances and exotic costumes. But during World War II she performed her greatest role yet: Spy. Onstage at the Casino de Paris, Joséphine Baker stretched her arms out toward the expanse of pale faces staring up at her as she sang. By now, the African-American expat superstar had grown used to performing for white crowds across Europe, but in 1939, the audience was changing. The men who came to see her new revue,...
Facebook_websiteTwitter_websitePinterest_websiteRSS_websiteTumblr_websiteIG_website