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The Crave Vesper Size: golf pencil Shape: that pen that Joan from Mad Men wears around her neck/between her boobs Sound: Katniss Everdeen’s arrow Strength: va-va voom Satisfaction: gaspin’ O Pairs with: a vesper, Bond-style, duh I was really, really excited about the Vesper when I saw it online, because it’s also a necklace, which seems so SEXY and DANGEROUS and SOPHISTICATED to me (so I can wear it over my pajamas as I drink Franzia Crisp White from a plastic camping mug, alone). When I...
What happens when a songwriter pens a tune for a client, but it gets rejected? Does it get wadded up and tossed in the trash? Or does the writer sing it herself? The latter approach is Sia’s solution on her new album, This Is Acting: every song but one was originally written for another artist.Sia’s side-business of writing hits for pop stars like Rihanna and Beyoncé is well known. After a successful alternative pop career, Sia took a break from being a singer to write hits...
Selma director Ava DuVernay, via Instagram A year ago, I decided to start writing about female-directed films.In a time when multiple research organizations are informing women how dismal the statistics are for women in Hollywood and when the number of female directed films recognized during awards season is so low it's almost negative, it is important to remind young women about the work that is being produced.Meet my series, "52 Weeks of Directors." Each week, I'll highlight a different talented director who just so happens to be a...
With TV comedies like Difficult People, The Comeback, OITNB, and Nurse Jackie racking up praise and awards in recent seasons, women who are “not here to make friends” are definitely having a cultural moment. This trend has also been going strong in literary fiction, and 2015 was an especially great year for novels about women who do what they want without apology.  As a reader, I’ve learned that good fiction about “bad” women penetrates my psyche in a way that no self-help book can. If...
In 1944 the kind people at Modess wanted women to know getting their periods was totally normal, nothing to get your womanly head “excited or nervous” about, a neccessary step on your way to baby-making town, and most of all keep fucking smiling.  Growing up and Liking it! (posted by Print) is 30% an informational pamphlet for young women and 70% an ad for “super-soft snowy-white Modess Sanitary Napkins.”  As would be expected from any type of sex ed from the 40s, this is chalk-full of...
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