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Fall is in full swing! People are decked out in their knit scarves and sweaters, sipping on seasonal flavored coffees and preparing costumes for Halloween festivities, so what better way to celebrate than with Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab, who have created a line combining the best things of Halloween into some devilishly alluring scents. The creators behind these haunting scents are releasing their Halloween fragrances, titled  “Halloweenies,” as well as their “Haunted House” collection.

WTF. Yesterday, CNN published an article examining how women vote with their hormones, not with, you know, their brains. Titled “Study looks at voting and hormones: Hormones may influence female voting choices,” the article has since been taken down from CNN, but this is the Internet, and it still exists in its full form here and here.

If you like mysteriously dark yet candy-sweet indie pop, Chaos Chaos’s S is the EP for you. Chaos Chaos is comprised of multitalented Brooklynite sisters Chloe and Asy Saavedra, formerly child stars of the indie pop band Smoosh. They play an array of instruments, including synthesizers, acoustic piano, many different types of drums, and saxophone, and they also use experimental vocals. Like BUST favorite Amanda Palmer, they funded their album through a successful Kickstarter campaign. Chaos Chaos recently released the official music video for their track “My Hands.

From the moment I saw I Was Told There’d Be Cake on the bookshelf, I knew Sloane Crosley was a girl after my heart and taste buds. As a 17 year-old, I have looked to my fellow New Yorker’s escapades as letters from an imaginary older sister. Although I am interested in a career as a style journalist, I also am very interested in keeping up with all of my mini-essays that I hash out in my own diary. Sloane herself is part anthropologist, part diarist; she is acutely observant of the people, places, and things, around her....she knows her nouns.

This past Monday at Terminal 5 in New York City, Alanis sang some new songs, some old songs, and most surprisingly, her beloved secret song! In case you don’t know about the secret song, it’s at the very very end of her first and most popular album, Jagged Little Pill. There are a few seconds of silence, and then all of a sudden, without any introduction, explanation, or track number, the heartbreaking final song begins—a cappella style. Check out the performance below. Note her adorable slip-up right before the second verse.

  Two women find unlikely friendship through a series of random events in Sean Baker’s film Starlet. Jane (Dree Hemingway) is a very thin, blond 21-year-old with a carefree attitude and a provocative lifestyle.  The story begins when Jane buys a thermos containing $10,000 at the yard sale of an older woman in her eighties, Sadie (Besedka Johnson).

  Imagine a land where boys play with dolls and girls want to grow up to be firemen – and nobody makes fun of them for it. A land where girls don’t worry about being pretty and happily proclaim, “I like what I look like.” A land where boys know that it’s alright to cry. A land where “you’ll do what you like, and be who you are.” This is the land imagined in the album, book, and TV special Free To Be…You And Me, which will celebrate its 40th anniversary in November.

  Last night, Tea Party-pandering Indiana Senate candidate Richard Mourdock claimed that pregnancies resulting from rape are “something God intended to happen.” His words come on the heels of a host of incendiary rape comments by members of the GOP –none of whom have a vagina, may I add. But abortion isn’t the only right at stake this election season.

News junkies and fans of Hanna Rosin will surely remember “The End of Men,” her 2010 Atlantic article about female success and how it relates to the simultaneous plummeting of male accomplishment. Her engrossing new book retains that provocative title and expounds on the facts she uncovered in her first go-round. Rosin focuses mostly on the shifting of familial responsibilities and career achievements between men and women by examining statistics and conducting interviews.

  Known for its robotic vocals (courtesy of a vocoder), Black Moth Super Rainbow has always been difficult to understand, both literally and figuratively—see also the masks the band members wear onstage and their aversion to press. For their fifth album, though, they’ve learned to use their words, discussing the many facets of love on tracks like “Hairspray Heart” and “Like a Sundae.” Kickstarter donations from fans funded Cobra Juicy, and the moral support seems to have expanded the Pittsburgh group’s sound.
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