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The Birkin bag by Hermès was designed for Jane Birkin in 1984, who complained to the then-president Jean-Louis Dumas that she couldn’t find a bag that was both stylish and practical. He designed one for her, calling it the Birkin bag. The bag comes in numerous styles, but one of its most popular variations is made from crocodile skin, and costs at least $36,000. Recently, PETA has uncovered the cruel process Hermes puts alligators and crocodiles through to get the material for their luxury bags. From...
  Macy Gray’s cool new love song has old-school vibes, and the video has adorable pastel animation reminiscent of an ad from the 1950s. But it’s not completely traditional: instead of being an ode to the human dude (or lady) in her life, Gray is waxing poetic to B.O.B., her vibrator.  “B is for Battery / O, Operated / B is for better ‘cause he’s never complicated,” Gray sings wryly, also cooing “He gets me so excited.” And watching the video, there’s no question that the “he”...
Jen Welter, a former college rugby player, will be the first female coach in NFL history. Welter will be joining the Arizona Cardinals as a training camp and preseason intern coaching inside linebackers for the upcoming season. I don’t even know much about football, and this is super exciting to me—I love the idea of a super cool lady bossing the men around in such a testosterone-y environment. “The truth is, [Welter] has more playing experience than some of the coaches who coach me now,”...
And here I thought I was just an asshole. Research from Harvard Business school suggests that sarcasm may improve the creativity and cognitive functioning of both the giver and receiver, and their findings were published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. The research found that, while sarcasm could screw you over (so if you don’t think your coworker gets it, you should probably go easy on them), it also stimulates creativity. That’s because sarcasm activates abstract thinking. If you’ve read any of my other writing,...
In artist Yolanda Dominguez’s video, “Ninos vs. Moda,” a bunch of wise eight-year-olds are shown various images from fashion campaigns and asked to describe them. The unsurprising results? Women are portrayed as being sick, drunk, in danger, fighting, passed out, even thrown in the trash—and men are superheroes, studying for university, and the bosses of good companies. Women are presented as powerless, while men are powerful; what else is new? Watch the adorable (and revealing) video below.   Via www.latina.com Image via www.latina.com Read More On Bust.com:  Here's A Genius Way To...
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