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  While the abortion debate continues to rage in the US, across the pond, in Ireland, news of a woman’s death, caused by the denial of an abortion, is stirring up the debate once more in a country where abortion remains inaccessible to women. Savita Halappanavar, 31, died on October 28 in University Hospital, Galway after being hospitalized for a week due to severe pains at 17 weeks of pregnancy. She was found to be miscarrying, but because a fetal heartbeat was detected, doctors refused to terminate the pregnancy.

Artist and designer Mike Perry opted to celebrate the release of his monograph Wondering Around Wandering in a non-traditional way: instead of a standard launch party, Perry created a pop-up exhibition of the same name in his Brooklyn neighborhood. The warehouse-turned-gallery eventually gained a new use as a community art space, playing host to pumpkin-painting parties, school groups, art workshops, and performances. As with all good things, Wondering Around Wandering’s three-month residency is coming to a close…and you—yes, you!—are invited to come celebrate.

Unofficial Icelandic national hero (and sometime Brooklynite) Björk is back, baby. Her new MOCA-commissioned video for “Mutual Core,” from her 2011 album-cum-educational art installation Biophilia, is just as odd and visually stunning as you’d expect: the singer, decked out in an Ursula-esque blue wig, directs a cast of gravity-defying humanoid crustaceans in a cycle of colliding, kissing, and pushing each other away. As the spare, organ-backed verse finally gives way to a sonic explosion, her creatures reach their breaking point, spewing lava and shrapnel.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor stopped by Sesame Street to dish out some career advice to the adorably oblivious, princess-obsessed Muppet Abby Cadabby. “Pretending to be a princess is fun, but it is definitely not a career,” says Sotomayor. "A career is a job you train for and prepare for and plan on doing for a long time." Though it is technically possible to make a career out of being a princess—and young Ms.

Ever fancy yourself doing the hula on the sands of Hawaii? Singer-songwriter Victoria Bergsman’s musical outfit Taken by Trees can transport you there, metaphorically speaking, with her third album Other Worlds. During a visit to the idyllic paradise, Bergsman found herself amidst a creative swell, so much so that she fashioned the LP as an impressionist poem that sings the tropical locale’s praises. On “Only You,” Bergsman lulls, “All I ever wanted is in front of me.

We’re super excited to share this awesome new song with you! JAN, the new solo project from Kim Talon of art-rock duo Eagle and Talon, is releasing her debut album, JAN, today, and BUST has a track just for you. “Red Crust Ow” is a riot grrrl-tinged rocker with plenty of fuzz to go around. The album was produced by John Goodmanson, who has also produced Blonde Redhead, The Gossip, and Sleater-Kinney. As part of Eagle and Talon, Kim Talon has collaborated with Reggie Watts and toured with Sia and Obi Best.

The reference to “six granddaughters” in the title of this dark, complex novel is deceiving: two are dead. One dies as an infant and pulls a shroud of everlasting grief over the family, and the other narrates the entire novel from beyond the grave while she floats in an afterlife. At the heart of the novel is Cecilia, a beautiful poet who is perceived as being the most talented and attractive among the granddaughters. Nonetheless, she is plagued by many demons, not the least of which is abuse at the hands of a mysterious man.

With more than 30 acts lined up for this year’s Tinderbox Music Festival, it was possible to rotate between the three stages of Webster Hall from noon to well past midnight and never go a minute without a new act taking the stage. Since I don’t have superhuman stamina, I made my way to the Main Stage at 7 pm to see Computer Magic, a.k.a. Danielle “Danz” Johnson, bleep-bloop through her electronic set. Danz performed for an intimate audience, who sat pow-wow style on the floor.

Last week at Maker Faire Africa, four Nigerian teenage girls presented a generator powered by—wait for it—pee. Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, and Faleke Oluwatoyin, all 14, and Bello Eniola, 15, invented the machine, which separates hydrogen from urine with an electrolytic cell, purifies the hydrogen, and pressurizes the resulting gas through a generator to power a lightbulb. According to the girls, one liter of urine can produce up to 6 hours of electricity.

  Remember those days on the playground at recess, running around wild and playing hand games with your friends? You know what I’m talking about. There were millions of them – Miss Mary Mack was the queen of these rhythmic narratives.  For example, I personally remember playing this one called “Shame Shame Shame” in the playground as a kid. If you’re not familiar with this one, the adorable little girl in the video below demonstrates it with her dad.
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