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I can’t get behind elaborate touchdown dances or emotionally overwrought ESPN documentaries, but I’ll always appreciate the hard work of the mascots on the sidelines. One of my earliest sports memories is being nuzzled by the Phillie Phanatic as I played a pre-game show on the field with my elementary school band. (Popularity: I haz it.) And at my alma mater, inflatable mascot (and John McCain doppelganger) Baldwin the Eagle was known for a tricky flip/headstand move that’s sure to bring a nostalgic tear to the heart of any Superfan.   Bringing in the noise and/or funk.

We're obsessed with this jam here at BUST HQ. Thrifting! Highly danceable beats! Footed onesies! Children! Fur rippling through the air in epic slow-mo! What's not to love? It already has 25 million hits on Youtube! How did we not know about this until last week? What is wrong with us? Now we need to listen to it every day just to make up for lost time! This IS fucking awesome.

In an industry that has always been considered a bit of a boys club, it's refreshing to see a woman’s name anywhere in the mix. Comic books were, after all, a "boy thing" for quite some time. Boys read them, boys collected them, boys were, almost exclusively, the main characters to appear in them. But in the last couple of decades, girls have started to become readers, collectors and stars of their own books. Slowly, women have started writing and drawing their own work, and are asserting themselves as a driving force behind the content of comics.

Adrienne Truscott, whose performance art and choreography have earned her international acclaim, is debuting her improvisational solo piece “…Too Freedom…” a show that aims to confront and challenge the norms of human interaction and self-presentation. Truscott touches on many different genres with her work and has been creating in NYC for over 15 years. She has recently produced several short and evening-length dance theater pieces, which can be found on her website.

I tend to get really upset and frustrated when I hear any news about child prostitution.  Well, last week a conference on women’s rights discussed how the economic crisis was affecting prostitution.  One of the most unsettling effects of the global economic situation is that younger and younger girls are being forced into the sex trade. The International Labour Organisation (ILO) released some figures earlier this year that showed about 21 million people (that’s three out of 1,000 people globally) are forced into labor.

BUST’s very own food columnist Chef Rossi is raking in good news left and right.    First, it has been announced that Rossi will be heading back to The Artist’s Room with a new one-woman show of her paintings, “Crystal Bay”. This latest collection features works in acrylic on paper that take the Provincetown Bay as their subject matter. Gallery hours are by appointment only, so snag yourself a time slot and head down to Houston Street for a gander. The show runs on weekdays from 12pm-5pm from now until Valentine’s Day.

Last Friday, I met singer/songwriter/maestro Erin Barra before she played the Paperbox Theatre in Brooklyn. I get really excited about strong, female musicians. But as pumped as I was to meet her, I didn’t expect to have her songs running through my head for the entire rest of the weekend. She tells me during our interview that she’s constantly hearing “you don’t look the way you sound.” With her shock of red hair and sharp, green eyes, perhaps she doesn’t fit the image associated with her big, R&B voice.

It comes as no surprise that America’s laws regarding teens and sex are bonkers and a half. The subject of sexuality in people under the age of 18 is still considered taboo by many Americans, and is simply unfathomable to others. The lack of effective legislation where minors and sex are concerned becomes glaringly obvious in the case of sexual assault, a lesson that those on the receiving end of this violence learn the hard way.

Women can’t do math? Child, please. Exhibit A: English mathematician Ada Lovelace, whose 197th birthday is being celebrated today with a Google Doodle, was the world’s first computer programmer. Ever. Ada was raised by a single mom—herself a talented mathematician—who was determined to give her daughter the most extensive scientific education possible to counteract the, er, artistic tendencies she inherited from her father.

When Elaine Hamel started Girls at Work out of a pickup truck back in 2000, she initially feared that there wouldn’t be enough interest in her girls-only woodshop classes. Fast forward 12 years and the New Hampshire-based nonprofit has given nearly 6,000 girls across New England the opportunity to try their hands at woodworking.  “As a builder I never met women in the field,” Hamel told us. “But we recently held a workshop on the cape and had over 400 girls build a small project in one day.
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