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A culture of consent is not something you hear about often especially in summer music festivals; however, the people from Our Music My Body are looking to change that. “Our Music My Body is a group of people working to create a safer space at music festivals,” said prevention and education specialist Matt Walsh. “We want everyone to be able to have a good time create an environment that is free of sexual harassment and promotes consent.” The organization is created by two anti-violence agencies in Chicago:...
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Society has a long way to go in terms of its representation of women. From Jessica Chastain calling out Cannes’ less-than-complex portrayal of its female characters to Andy Murray correcting a reporter that neglected to acknowledge Serena Williams’ accomplishments, it seems that the world still has a difficult time accepting and supporting women in nontraditional roles. When I watched Wonder Woman, it literally moved me to tears because it was so empowering - and so rare - to see a lady with a mind of her...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
When Jodie Whittaker was announced as the first female Doctor in Doctor Who’s history, I expected there to be some backlash and criticism over the casting, but The Sun and The Daily Mail took it to a whole new level of misogyny with their coverage. They decided the most noteworthy acting in Whittaker’s past was the nude scenes from her movie Venus, and they just had to cover that. They then preceded to screenshot scenes where Whittaker is nude and very loosely relate it to...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
When Mary Tyler Moore died in January at 80, the world lost a cultural icon whose '70s sit-com changed the way America viewed working women. Think you know the secret to Mary’s success? Then take the quiz! 1. Mary Tyler Moore was born on December 29, 1936, in __________. a. Brooklyn, NY b. Los Angeles, CA c. Winchester, VA d. Paris, France 2. Mary started working at 17, playing a dancing elf named "Happy Hotpoint" in appliance commercials that ran during the TV program __________. a. The Red Skelton Show b. Adventures of...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.
By the time I finish writing this, Galen Hooks, L.A. based choreographer, producer, dancer, advocate, and more (a lot more), will likely have flown 238,900 miles to the moon, performed a killer dance routine in a pair of jet black stilettos, and made it back to New York in time to teach an afternoon intensive class. But that’s to be expected from an extraordinary dancer. For Hooks, busy days (sans space travel) packed with dance classes, intensives, traveling around the world, and helping dancers reach their full...
Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.