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Since Trump’s election, my social media feeds are full of people from traditionally oppressed groups (women, LGBTQ, people of color, religious minorities) posting about their anger at current events and people from traditionally privileged groups (white men, often Christian) shaming them for their anger. The policing of our emotions perpetuates a culture of silencing that allows racism and misogyny to thrive. Here is why you should stop telling us not to be angry and what you should do instead. 1. Anger is an appropriate response to...
I visited a local health clinic for a general physical exam. “Are you sexually active?” was among the many intrusive questions asked. Sometime between taking my temperature and making me stand on a scale, the young, red-haired nurse (not a natural redhead, by the way) asked me this very personal question. I’m 24 years old and no stranger to the cold, bleak buildings we call medical centers. Typically, I breeze through these sorts of questions with an air of indifference. However, this time I was in...
Virtual reality is finally an actual reality. Here’s why you need to try it. You’re in someone’s kitchen in the Gaza strip. To your right, a woman is busy cooking, while another woman tells you about her life here. You look down and admire the tiled floor, then turn around and check out the appliances. Next, you’re standing alone on a giant plain. The sun is setting, and when you look up, you see that there isn’t a cloud in the sky. In front of you,...
Enough Said “It’s hard to pin down what is so great about Holofcener’s work,” said a review of Enough Said in The New Yorker. It’s true. Like Nora Ephron before her and perhaps Lynn Shelton after her, Holofcener’s five films are easy to watch and put you into a world you may not necessarily know but somehow feels familiar. Holofcener makes her female characters not likable, exactly, but relatable. They are nice enough people but we also recognize and relate to their flaws. As The New Yorker...
Memes. We all know them, love them, laugh with them, and sometimes even cry. Memes are pairings of text and images that are so relatable, we can’t help but share them. In the evolution of meme-making, a feminist subculture has been born. Meme admins and makers are creating safe spaces on their pages, challenging the hyper-aggressive aspects of internet culture, and revealing what it is like to be a girl alone on the internet. Many of these accounts critically engage with feminist theory and activism, as...