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Rasenth is an illustrator, comic artist, and animator from California, currently living in Japan.  You've probably seen some of Razzy's work on social media already, as these epic illustrated takedowns of sexism have been shared countless times across social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.  Since the comics made their debut on Razzy's Tumblr in 2014, they have become required viewing for anyone who needs help explaining the subtle ways sexism affects everyone's lives.
“I don’t really care why you’re an asshole. The fact that you’re an asshole is enough.”Martha Plimpton isn’t one to mince words, especially when it comes to reproductive rights. The actress, singer and activist has a lot to say — and even more to do — on the subject of women and their health as well as the people (or assholes) trying to restrict reproductive rights. Plimpton is the co-founder of AisFor, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing women's reproductive rights and ending the stigma against abortion care.
The only people having more fun than you will while watching Shaan Mutiyaaran Di dance are the dancers themselves. The all female NYC-based Bhangra dance team—whose name translates to “the pride of women”— has been taking the competitive bhangra world by storm. Bhangra is a traditional folk dance from the Punjab region of South Asia and is typically male-dominated in competition; all-women teams are uncommon and all-women teams winning are almost unheard of.
Photo by Ari Seth Cohen As we get older, it’s easy to worry about our looks and to fear invisibility. The antidote to that is Advanced Style, photographer Ari Seth Cohen’s online homage to older people’s street style. His second book, Advanced Style: Older and Wiser (out April 26 from powerHouse), features photos of amazing women and men from around the world who make every day a performance with their wardrobes. Forget invisibility, these gorgeous seniors shine in their fabulous getups. The book also includes a few essays from A.S.
Denim Day is an international movement that grew out of protest to a 2010 rape case that was overturned because the judge said that the survivor's tight jeans meant that she must have helped her rapist remove them. Every year, people wear denim on Denim Day as a way to fight rape culture and raise awareness of sexual assault. Join Fashion Week Brooklyn this year on April 27. For the past three years, I, Stewella Daville, have been recognized in the fashion industry as a high fashion model.
We’ve got good news and bad news about Twitter.The bad news is that Twitter seems to be notorious for online harassment: doxing, threats of violence, public shaming, Gamergate, MRAs, rape threats — we could go on. We all know that Twitter struggles to compete with the growth rate seen by other social networks, and their attempts to lure new users to the Land of the Blue Bird (longer tweets! Polls! Algorithms! GIFs!) have failed to acknowledge that repeated harassment is, for too many, the reason for leaving Twitter.
This April is the 20th National Poetry Month, and what better way to celebrate than by curling up with a good book? While most of us can name at least a few women in the field, here’s a list of contemporary poets you may not be familiar with. 1. Claudia RankineRankine is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and has published five volumes of poetry, two plays and various essays. Her 2014 book, Citizen: An American Lyric, won the PEN Open Book Award, in addition to numerous others, and was a finalist for the National Book Award.
For a world so big, people have never seemed to stop asking themselves the basic question of “How do I meet other people?” When you live on a planet of seven billion, a part of you just wants to say, “Just walk outside! That’s it.” But it never really seems to be that easy; especially in the age we live in, where people feel more comfortable with a virtual interaction than one of the physical form. In fact, it would seem that the more comfortable we become with meeting people online, the more fearful we are of having basic human interactions.
The internet is an amazing place to share thoughts and ideas and create a unique dialogue between writers and their readers. I am grateful for criticisms, new information, and the expansion of a conversation though the format of online comments. What I don’t appreciate are hateful, obtrusive, and obnoxious comments. What scares me the most are comments containing threats and violence. This is a reality that writers face in their field, and while it varies and there is a spectrum, online harassment is most likely to happen to women, and least likely to happen to white men.
Adam is 18 years old and a senior in high school—he loves pizza, nature, pretty girls and video games. He despises mowing the lawn and prefers to spend much of his time in his bedroom playing on his iPhone. When in a bookstore, the manga section is his top priority. He talks about wanting to go college to become a zoologist. Some days this changes to veterinarian. Other days this changes to, “Maybe we should just open our own food truck.” Sounds pretty typical, right? If you ever met Adam, though, you wouldn’t think he was 18.
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