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Growing up in the late 60s, one of my feminist heroes was Batgirl from the Batman TV show. The character Barbara Gordon,  librarian by day, quickly morphed into her alter ego Batgirl when trouble arose. She was sexy, tough, rode a motorcycle, got to wear a fabulous costume, and kicked major butt. Played by  Yvonne Craig (seen here), check out this PSA demanding equal pay for women. Have we really come that  long of a way, baby?  [video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szZsKdJYR-A 425x344] via buzzfeed and dangerous minds ...
  Being gay is hard. But being a young gay person is even harder. Not only must you face homework-filled nights and awkward stages, but you're also forced to grapple with a difference that could cost you everything: your family, your friends, your education, your job. Oh, and let’s not forget about those good Christian pastors who want to watch you perish behind an electric fence. The many issues affecting these teens have garnered national attention in recent years, and now, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has released...
Two years ago, performance artist Marina Abramović had a much-buzzed-about retrospective, “The Artist is Present,” at the the Museum of Modern Art, and it’s the subject (and title) of a new HBO documentary by Matthew Akers and Jeff Dupre. For the retrospective, Abramović sat in a chair (without making a peep or getting up for anything--not even to use the bathroom) for three months. Between March and May 2010, from the time the MoMA opened in the morning to the time it closed at night, Abramović could be...
Recently, a few friends and I decided to create a short film. We wanted it to be colorful, fun, and sugary sweet. We filmed on a 1960's Super 8 and I made sure to include all of my favorite things such as cupcakes, picnics, polaroids, and macaroons. There's even a mini wardrobe montage and a twee pop tune by Afternoon Naps!  Initially the project was just for fun, but I'm excited to announce that this Thursday, our short film, 'fetti, will be featured as part of...
In today's world, where 12-year-olds are engrossed in their iPhones, and substituting a phone call in place of a text message is nearly inconceivable, technology like Nokia’s indestructible brick of a cell phone and the VCR that’s currently collecting dust in your basement (if not already inhabiting a dumpster) seems prehistoric. But thanks to nostalgic noise enthusiast Brendan Chilcutt—the face behind The Museum of Endangered Sounds, highlighted in a WeTheUrban post earlier this month—the unmistakable sounds of old technology are alive and kicking. The archive of endangered—or worse,...