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Os Mutantes is Portuguese for fun. Okay, that may not be strictly true (it means The Mutants), but this 60s/70s band are so damn fun that Brazil should consider a definition change. Re-emerging in 2009 after a 35-year hiatus (as you do), this six-piece group have been entertaining the globe with their psychedelic/tropicalismo rock. The band is releasing their tenth studio album Fool Metal Jacket on April 30th.  The album is like a 45 minute long summer party in your ears. The title track sounds like when...
While modern feminist conversations frequently fall on the topic of choice for professional women – do I choose my career, or do I choose motherhood – the argument generally stops there, and never addresses the choice some women make not to be a mother at all. American culture praises mothers, and rightly so, but we are also so obsessed with them that more frequently we lean on the topic of the right to choose an abortion or not, therefore overshadowing the other more obvious right to...
Crafting runs in this vendor's blood. A third generation crafty lady, Diana Rupp learned the tricks of the trade from her mother and grandmother. Pushed by a desire to pursue clothing design and a love for making things, Make Workshop was born in 2002. At BUST, we've fallen head over heels for Diana's crafting workshops and tutorial books. We are lucky enough to have Make Workshop hold a special needlepoint tutorial at the BUST Spring Craftacular. Rupp recently published a book on...
Today, it's easy to take female jazz musicians for granted. When they’re up on stage doing their groove thang or you’re rocking out to an album, you may not be aware of what females had to go through just to have the right to play jazz.   This is where director Judy Chaikin steps in with her new documentary The Girls In The Band.  Intern Melissa called up the inspirational director to discuss her latest work and life as a lady in the film business. Melissa: What was...
In the U.S., the bride and her parents are expected to pay for the wedding, the gown, and to be in charge of the wedding arrangements.  However, in China it is the opposite. Instead, grooms are expected to pay a “bride price” – ordinarily $10,000 – often alongside purchasing an apartment and a car.  A more traditional and old-fashioned practice, these wedding standards are taking over China and redefining marital practices, affecting both Chinese men and women. NPR reporter Louisa Lim associates this new market-place marriage...