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Living in the United States, it is hard to imagine what it would be like to have your rights strictly limited. We can’t fathom how it would feel if, during a peaceful protest, all forms of communication were disassembled and we were sprayed down with tear gas. We must try to place ourselves in that situation, or at least realize injustice when it is staring at us in the face. But it’s not. The human rights violations that are occurring in Istanbul, Turkey are hardly being televised...
Come out for a night chock-full of prizes, dranks, and LOLs. A Is For and Babeland have teamed up to fundraise for women's health and reproductive rights and celebrate Babeland's 20th anniversary this Thursday! Co-founded by Martha Plimpton and Lizz Winstead, A Is For is a program with a mission to advocate for women's reproductive rights. Winstead will host hilarious comedians including Darbi Worley and Beth Lisick who will be sharing some amazing sex toy stories. You'll be able to win raffle prizes and have...
Rehana Kausar and Sobia Kamar astounded many conservatives in their home country of Pakistan when they recently married in a civil partnership in the UK. Kausar and Kamar are the first lesbian Muslims to wed, as LGBT groups are scorned (or at least ignored if they're quiet enough) in custom and law in Pakistan. The ladies immediately applied for political asylum, as they'd received death threats from opponents of their decision in both the UK and Pakistan. Hopefully the right of asylum will lead to...
There's no denying that Facebook has influenced the way people think about themselves and their friends, as well as the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. This can be seen in the way in which people behave and what they post on their accounts - endlessly posting beachside bikini shots, photos of exotic clubs, new job promotions and even their magnificent$15 lettuce lunches. It brings me to ask a very relevant question, who really cares? And further, if it is so unimportant, then why do...
I was thirteen years old—in full teenage rebellion mode, skateboard tucked under my left arm, backpack containing books and homework that would never see the light of day. My friend Caine swaggered beside me in his sleeveless GWAR tee and shaggy mullet, obviously the more accomplished vandal. We lived four doors down from each other on the same street in Richmond, VA’s West End. He pulled out his crumpled box of Marlboro reds and lit a half-flattened stick. “Hey, can I get one of those?”...