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November 8: This is gonna happen. November 9: This fucking happened. It has been almost exactly two years since I went through the less-than-ideal situation of coming out to my family. Despite their excommunication and holistic denial of my identity, I had moved on. And so had our nation. Or so I thought. The morning after the election, laying in bed, I kept thinking back to what my aunt told me after I came out to my family: “That may be okay in your world, but where I live...
I wasn't looking to find someone new when I got to uni, let alone cheat. As far as I was aware, I was in love with the man I would spend the rest of my life with. But I didn’t expect the wandering glances of other guys (and girls) and besides, I hadn't had the chance to flex my selfish bitch yet. Throughout my teens I'd been an angel, when I wasn't excused by booze, and really I didn't have a rebellious streak in my...
The first thing I learned when my mom died was how many reminders of her, of us, I was left with. The Harry Potter series. Stephen King. Leaf piles. Coffee. Chinese food. Pizza with extra cinnamon sticks. Everything reminded me of the life we had shared together. Grief is a funny thing. Some days, I reveled in the things that reminded me of her. I’d curl up in her old jean jacket and read to myself the books we used to read out loud to each...
Here at BUST, the holiday season is upon us and preparations for the most wonderful time of the year are in full swing! On the cover, we’ve got Hollywood veteran and online feminist rabble-rouser Rose McGowan plotting world domination with her patriarchy-smashing pal Amber Tamblyn. Inside, we’ve got exclusive interviews with Megan Mullally, Constance Wu, and the Strokes’ Nick Valensi; a revealing biography of legendary female surrealist Leonora Carrington; ’80s punk rock skate crew the Hags; and of course, our show-stopping Holiday Gift Guide! And get...
  Yesterday evening, police used water cannons on peaceful DAPL protesters in freezing temperatures. The activists, who prefer to be called “water protectors,” have been protesting the completion of the 3.7 billion dollar Dakota Access Project — an oil pipeline that would run through North Dakota all the way down to Illinois, where it would connect with a pre-existing pipeline. The protesters, who include Indigenous Americans and environmentalists both, are occupying the government-owned land on which the final piece of pipeline in slated to be constructed,...