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Nothing beats a good 'ole parody of “Blurred Lines,” a song in which for I have an ardent hatred. If you haven’t checked it out already, read our Top 7 “Blurred Lines” parodies! In that list, you’ll find the video that took off this past Labor Day weekend. The feminist parody, “Defined Lines” was briefly taken off of YouTube Monday because of it’s “inappropriate context.” What’s hilarious about this is that the video is of three New Zealand law students who sing about dismantling the patriarchy...
    Early on in the documentary Girl, a DJ named Colette says that DJing-while-female is mainly about “ears and hands. It’s not different depending on your gender.” Director Kandeyce Jorden would have you believe otherwise, and she presents her findings in an documentary filmed in the years immediately preceding the current EDM explosion. Forbes released its “Electronic Cash Kings of 2013” list in August—and “kings” is exactly right, because the 12 top-earning DJs are all male. As anyone who follows Diplo on Instagram can tell you, the...
  Let’s face it, lipstick is pretty cool. It takes so much skill and grace to apply it, and it oozes vintage glam. But it also contains toxic metals: eek! The majority of lipsticks contain lead, but the amounts are pretty trace. Until recently, researchers were relatively unconcerned, but then they figured out that higher levels of eight other metals are also present in many brands.    University of California at Berkeley environmental health professor Dr. Katherine Hammond tells The New York Times, “It matters because this is...
[Reposted with permission from  JessicaGottlieb.com ] Here's an amazing letter to teenage girls that was written in response to the now-viral post, FYI (if you're a teenage girl).  Dear girls, By now you’re probably aware that Mrs. Hall thinks you’re a dirty slut who can’t be Facebook friends with her sons. By now you’ve probably been told 93,872 times in your life that The Internet is Forever and you should never ever post anything online that you don’t want the whole world to see because the whole wide world...
In her debut collection of short stories, Chinelo Okparanta takes a look at what it’s like to be a woman in Nigeria. Okparanta, who lived in the African country until she was 10, tells tales of women struggling to survive within the confines of a culture that has not been (and is still not) especially kind to their gender, and although the stories might be fictional, there is clearly a lot of truth behind them. In “America” she focuses...