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  “What is between my legs is not thoroughly who I am. If gender is black and white, I’m grey,” says Ryley Pogensky, a gender queer model participating in Barney’s New York’s new campaign. Pogensky is one of almost twenty transgender and gender queer models featured in the catalog and ad images, shot by the legendary Bruce Weber.    Each model has a story to tell, hailing from communities across the globe. Culturally, socio-economically, and even professionally—some are not professional models—they compose a richly diverse group. Dressed to...
  In 1949, people were finally starting to think about women’s sex lives. Around 20 years before the Women’s Liberation and sexual education was in full-force, the female orgasm remained a mystery. Without knowledge of the clitoris or the G-spot, many women didn’t experience climaxing, and sadly, many were made to feel “frigid” and asexual because of it.    How elusive and majestic, exactly, was the female orgasm? This illustration published in Sexology magazine in 1949 should give us a clue."As seen by a surrealist artist,” we might...
Like many parents, the photographer Emer Gillespie loves photographing her daughter, cataloging her family’s growth through a family photo album. Her daughter, 11-year-old Laoisha, who happens to have Downs Syndrome, took an active interest in her mother’s ritual of peering through her lens at a pair of shoes, an open field, the bedroom.  While many family photos include posed children staring at an authoritative parent behind the camera, Gillespie invites Laoisha to participate in the image-making process for a collaborative series titled Picture You, Picture Me....
The photographer Suzanne Heintz is sick and tired of being told that she needs to marry and have kids. Although she acknowledges the strides made by women in the past decades in her interview with Feature Shoot, she feels now that a new sort of feminine mystique has emerged in the past years; rather than being expected to be perfect housewives, society now demands that women have the family, the career, and the flourishing social life. Amidst pressure to “have it all,” Heintz has proudly...
  Our media bombards us with two polarized representations of acceptable and desirable female sexuality: the madonna and the whore. In his series DIRTYLAND, the artist Dillon Boy complicates these constructs, positioning what he calls “the pure, untainted characters of Walt Disney” within aesthetics associated with the contemporary objectification and hyper-sexualization of women on “billboards […] and ad[s] in […] publication[s].” Although the work inspires important discussions on the ways in which women are hyper-sexualized, it remains to be seen whether this kind of work is...
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