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The Media Coop recently posted an article titled "Dating Tips for the Feminist Man" that offers some amazing tips for practicing what you preach. There is a lot of repetition, but you can never discuss emotional check-ins too much! An interesting point made in the article is that, while being a sensitive guy is awesome, there is more to being a feminist than simply not being a jerk-off.  Tip number four illustrates just that:  "If you don't know how you feel, or you're not sure, or you...
Trigger Warning: This post contains the description of sexual assault and may be triggering to survivors. I’ve been hearing a lot of talk about comparing Miley Cyrus’ sexual antics to Madonna’s thought-provoking ways of the 1980s. Just to clarify, Madonna’s the best and no one can ever compare, ok? But in the November issue of Harper’s Bazaar, Madonna writes a strikingly candid letter about her nonconforming teenage days, being sexually assaulted during her first year of living in New York City, her provocative actions, finding religion,...
Frats: Keg stands, Tikki torches, and brothers for life. Two weeks ago, an email surfaced from Georgia Techs Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, describing how to “Lure Rapebait”. The email goes into intense detail about how to hook up with women at parties.  The email explicitly tells the other fraternity brothers exactly what any girl wants: "A GOOD DICK GRIND". “Here is how to dance: Grab them on the hips with your 2 hands and then let them grind against your dick. After that...
Ideally, a bookstore is an endless cornucopia of knowledge, a place where boys and girls can explore their most personal curiosities. But at a recent visit to the bookstore, eight year old KC Cooper, daughter of author Constance Cooper, found something quite unexpected and distressing: sexist children’s books. KC loves the outdoors, and as she thumbed through adventure books, she found one that included tales of animal attacks and natural disasters. The book is entitled “How to Survive (Almost) Anything,”...
Amy Poehler, the world’s most fabulously awesome human being x1000, wrote a wonderfully thoughtful piece for The New Yorker about her experience as a 17-year old working at an ice cream parlor. The essay, which takes place in 1989—the summer before Poehler’s first year at Boston College—details the tribulations of working in the restaurant business, and explores a familiar topic: adolescent unease about the future. Recalling her work at the parlor, “Chadwick’s,” Poehler states, “Summer jobs are often romantic; the time frame creates a perfect parenthesis. Chadwick’s was...