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If you are over this Polar Vortex as much as every other person on the internet, Tacocat is here to save the day with their surf-rock period anthem "Crimson Wave." This catchy song makes me feel like I am at the best beach party ever, with dancing sharks and mermaids, while menstruating my cares away. Crabs and cramps have never sounded like so much fun and once you watch the music video below, you'll understand why.   Image Via Hardly Art ...
  Barbie has made headlines that lately; as we continue to push toy companies towards a doll that includes more diverse body types, ethnicities, careers, and lifestyles, some groundbreaking artists have reworked and re-appropriated the toy to challenge expectations and sexist assumptions. My personal favorite of these artists, Margaux Lange, shared a recent Barbie tidbit with her social media network this morning: the doll is going to be featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue.    A Mattel spokesperson explains of the new campaign, “Barbie is a legend...
In her memoir The Marriage Act: The Risk I Took To Keep My Best Friend In America And What It Taught Us About Love, Liza Monroy challenges the definition of marriage and true companionship. She chronicles the experiences she had during her first marriage, a green card union intended to save her gay best friend from deportation and a life of hiding his sexuality in his home country, exploring how those experiences shaped her interpretation of what it truly means to be a working part...
Trigger warning: this post features a video that stages sexual violence.  Posted for only a week, Eléonore Pourriat's 2010 short film Oppressed Majority (Majorité Opprimée) has reached over 3.3 million views for its English-subtitled version on YouTube. Oppressed Majority is a detailed and poignant look at sexual harassment and violence that Pourriat achieves by turning the tables: "On what seems to be just another ordinary day, a man is exposed to sexism and sexual violence in a society ruled by women." The man, Pierre, faces condescension, street...
Though I was born too late to have experienced the rise, or even the fall of the revolutionary Sassy magazine, I'm still fascinated by its revolutionary nature. My curiosity has involved scouring Etsy and Ebay for old issues and spending hours poring over every page of the faded editorials and articles.  It's been 20 years since Sassy became defunct, but the stories felt as real to me as if they'd just been published.  If you're hearing about Sassy magazine for the first time, all you need to know...