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As an art form, public art is all about scale: the larger the wall, the better. In transforming huge walls into canvases, street artists have found a way to transform the visual aesthetic, but also function, of a given space. Walls become not just surfaces for painting but areas for social commentary. Since starting this blog, I’ve been interested in the ways that street art can create an experience — not only aesthetically, but through its ability to spark dialogue.
  Ghostbusters director Paul Feig makes comedies about women that women actually enjoy   “I like women,” writer/director/producer Paul Feig, 53, tells me during a chat in his Burbank, CA, office, where the nameplate on his desk reads: Chief Business Gentleman. “I have a healthy relationship with the women in my life. I always have.”Perhaps it’s this lifelong affinity with the XX crowd that is the secret to Feig’s success.
The cover of Arielle Greenberg’s Locally Made Panties is delightfully audacious. It’s a photograph from 1975 of a woman with the Farrah Fawcett flip, reclining on a bed, legs spread. She wears a white tank and pulls her white panties up by the waist and against her vulva, giving us a peek at her pubic hair. Locally Made Panties is a collection of essays detailing Greenberg’s fraught relationship with her feminism and her obsession with clothes, body image, and consumerism.
Let’s talk about Pokemon Go. As I’m sure you’re already aware, Pokemon Go is a free app that launched a little over a week ago and allows you to catch Pokemon in the “real world” through your phone — meaning that as you walk around your neighborhood with your phone out, a Pokemon will appear in the camera, and you can catch it by “throwing” Pokeballs. It’s already more popular than Twitter and Tinder. If you’re in your teens, twenties or early thirties now, there’s a good chance you were obsessed with Pokemon as a child — I was.
Funny woman Amy Schumer revealed in an interview with Marie Claire that her first sexual experience “was not a good one.” She revealed to the magazine that when she lost her virginity at age 17, it wasn’t consensual. She added that, at the time, she didn’t realize what had happened. “I didn't think about it until I started reading my journal again,” Schumer said. “When it happened, I wrote about it almost like a throwaway. It was like, And then I looked down and realized he was inside of me. He was saying, ‘I'm so sorry’ and ‘I can't believe I did this.
When I arrived at the theater for a press screening of the new Ghostbusters last week, I had low expectations. Not because I hate films starring women (hello, I work for BUST), or because I’m anti-remake (I loved Star Wars: The Force Awakens), but because, truthfully, the trailers weren’t great, and while I think each of the stars is amazingly talented, each of them also has a few clunkers on their IMDB page. Early buzz wasn’t good, and I tried to keep my hopes down.But within the first few minutes, I knew the new Ghostbusters would be great.
Growing up in Boston, Laura Poitras planned to become a chef, spending years as a cook at L’Espalier, a French restaurant. After high school, however, she moved to San Francisco and became interested in experimental filmmaking. After studying at both San Francisco Art Institute and The New School, she decided to pursue a life of filmmaking. But like everyone else, she didn’t know how much September 11, 2001, would change her life. Poitras said, living in New York at that time, there was a sense that people could have done anything.
LGBT teens often don't see themselves in the coming-of-age books that are taught in schools. Here are 15 YA novels that fix that: 1. When Everything Feels like the Movies by Raziel Reid For Jude, life is one big movie set. Using his mother’s heels and make-up, he’s ready for his part. He’s got the love interest, the best friend, and the antagonist all in place. All that’s left is to watch the drama unfold. Jude is a feel-good character set in an authentically gritty world.
Gloria Steinem joined Instagram in April of this year, and as time has gone by, her Instagram account has become one of my favorites. Gloria, 82, is an iconic feminist organizer, writer, activist, founder of Ms. magazine, cofounder of the Women’s Media Center...and now, social media star. Gloria’s Instagram feed has a perfect breakdown of behind-the-scenes looks at her work, graphics and links urging people to act to end injustice, and photos with fellow brilliant women like Shonda Rhimes, Lena Dunham and Meryl Streep. Plus, her #tbt photos are AMAZING.
I’d had enough. Another guy — this one I met on Bumble, I think — had just ghosted. After messaging on the app, we’d moved to texting, with both of us bookmarking topics we were excited to soon discuss IRL. When he didn’t return a text after four days, I checked in. He apologized, claiming his intended text hadn’t made it through the mobile-waves, evidently, and I gamely started bantering again. Hours later, and nothing. Days later, still nothing. He was gone. No drama, no games, no explanation. Just absence. I didn’t lose any sleep over him, but I admit to disappointment.
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