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In today's world, where 12-year-olds are engrossed in their iPhones, and substituting a phone call in place of a text message is nearly inconceivable, technology like Nokia’s indestructible brick of a cell phone and the VCR that’s currently collecting dust in your basement (if not already inhabiting a dumpster) seems prehistoric. But thanks to nostalgic noise enthusiast Brendan Chilcutt—the face behind The Museum of Endangered Sounds, highlighted in a WeTheUrban post earlier this month—the unmistakable sounds of old technology are alive and kicking.

The archive of endangered—or worse, extinct—sounds encourages visitors to “take a listen down memory lane” with its easy-to-navigate interface. It includes sounds that you thought you’d never hear again, but after a quick click, you’ll discover that they’re most likely engrained into your brain from when you were 12 years old. Sounds range from the slightly creepy jingle that greeted you once upon a time during the start up of the Windows ’95 interface, to the sound Pac Man made when he was doin’ his thing, to the default ring tone that cell phones used to make, before it was possible to set them to serenade you with the "Thong Song" every time you received an incoming call.

While the rest of the world transitions into chic, silent touch-screens, Chilcutt's site provides an oasis of sentimentality in contrast. Prepare to accompany me in my nostalgia-driven swoon fest!

Image courtesy of SaveTheSounds.info